HE SAID, “‘I CAN’T BREATHE'” : FOR THE LIVES OF THOSE TAKEN : TRIBUTE TO ERIC GARNER

JUSTICE FOR ERIC GARNER

As an African-American female residing abroad, I can attest to uncomfortable, racially incited situations involving police officers, border police, albeit, authority figures, in Europe and Stateside. For the record, I have had to initiate legal intervention as a result of situations that simply speaking, “turned bad”. Racially unbalanced realities of life for African-Americans, including the historical causes and effects, often creeps into conversations among colleagues. I highly recommend that folk read the controversial and enlightening psychological observations of renowned psychiatrist, Dr. Frances Cress Welsing(Cress Theory of Color Confrontation), and the study of melanin as being an inherent trait for superiority. The entire system of racism is to ensure white genetic survival.
The dominance of African-American males in prison is inherently connected to the system of white racist supremacy. Our black men continue to be attacked, targeted, imprisoned, and killed in a systematic strategy of black annihilation. Bitter food that does not have to be swallowed. This very significant conversation should remain priority. 

For the Lives of Those Taken
by Anna Greene Dell’Era(All Rights Reserved)

My Brother, Brothers, Sister, Sisters
We see and feel from an ancestral groan
the abyss through which your life filtered down.
We struggle to understand, yet hold fast to faith.
It is not man we fight, but principalities of evil.
We remain vigilant, educated, careful and wise.
We continue to procreate.
We continue to laugh, to sing, to lift up God’s name.
We continue to dance.
Because we will not remain soaked in a mire of bloody grief.
We lift up your name, names, Brother, Brothers, Sister, Sisters.
We have not forgotten
But continue to rise and harvest the fruit!

Advertisements

About whenquiet

A child of God, opinionated, survivor, eloquent, elegant, exquisite, and humble, loving life and shining light to those who are in the shadow.
This entry was posted in African American History, Contemplation, Life Perspective, mental health, Poetry and stories, Uncategorized, xe, xenophobia and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s